Shoulder & Elbow

The Shoulder and Elbow Service, a specialty service of UW Medical Center's Bone and Joint Surgery Center, provides comprehensive evaluation and management for a wide range of shoulder and elbow problems, including:

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On which we try to provide the best and most current information on shoulder arthritis.

We offer the full spectrum of shoulder and elbow surgeries, from arthroscopy and minimally-invasive procedures, to complex fracture work, partial replacement (hemiarthroplasty) and complete replacement (total shoulder or elbow arthroplasty, as well as reverse shoulder arthroplasty).

Nationally Recognized Program

The Shoulder and Elbow Service is a component of UW Medical Center's Bone and Joint Surgery Center, which is ranked by U.S. News and World Report as the top orthopaedic program in the western half of the United States.

Our physicians and research programs lead the way in innovative care for shoulder and elbow problems. We are constantly developing new, more effective methods of evaluating and treating our patients.

  • Dr. Frederick Matsen, Professor of UW Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, has been listed as Top Doctors in the category of Orthopaedics. News source:  Seattle Magazine, 2012.
  • Dr. Winston Warme, the Chief of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery at the University of Washington, is an Associate Professor, career academician, highly skilled surgeon, researcher and teacher.

Our Approach

Our team of specialty-trained physicians, therapists, physicians' assistants, and nurses uses a multidisciplinary approach in caring for patients, with easy access to other world-class experts at UWMC who can assist with diagnosis and treatment plans. Practical Evaluation and Management of the Shoulder (33.5 MB)

Management options can range from simple exercises to major reconstructive surgery performed at UW Medical Center, where specially trained nurses and anesthesiologists work with us to ensure quality patient care before, during, and after surgery. Our goal is maximum recovery of joint function.

The physical therapists in the Exercise Training Center, also part of the Bone and Joint Surgery Center, offer non-surgical care and post-surgical rehabilitation programs.

Location

The Shoulder and Elbow Service is located in the Bone and Joint Surgery Center at UWMC-Roosevelt, an outpatient facility at 4245 Roosevelt Way N.E. in Seattle's University District.

Making an Appointment

You may make your own appointment at the Shoulder and Elbow Service or you may be referred by your physician.

Make a referral.

You may also call the Bone and Joint Surgery Center at 206-598-BONE (2663) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (except holidays).

Shoulder & Elbow Articles

  1. About the Mechanics of Shoulder Stability.
  2. Anterior glenoid reconstruction for unstable dislocating shoulders. Surgery to restore lost anterior glenoid bone and deep the socket with a bone graft can restore shoulder anatomy and lessen pain and improve function.
  3. Arthroplasty in Cuff Tear Arthropathy: Surgery for shoulders with a rotator cuff tear and arthritis can lessen shoulder pain and improve function with joint replacement.
  4. Arthroplasty in Post-traumatic Arthritis: Surgery for shoulders with arthritis after and injury, fracture, or previous surgery can lessen shoulder pain and improve function with a special type of joint replacement.
  5. Atraumatic Shoulder Instability.
  6. Bankart repair for unstable dislocating shoulders: Surgery to anatomically and securely repair the torn anterior glenoid labrum and capsule without arthroscopy can lessen pain and improve function for active individuals.
  7. Basics of failed shoulder surgery, complications of shoulder surgery and revision shoulder surgery
  8. Chondrolysis
  9. Clinical Conditions Involving the Cuff.
  10. Clinical Conditions Related to the Rotator Cuff.
  11. Clinical Presentation and Evaluation of Glenohumeral Arthritis.
  12. Clinical Presentation of Glenohumeral Instability.
  13. Clinical Problems of the Shoulder.
  14. Compartmental Syndromes.
  15. Complications of shoulder surgery: revision surgery may be helpful when a total shoulder joint replacement, rotator cuff repair or surgery for dislocation fails or is unsuccessful in relieving pain, stiffness, weakness or instability
  16. Cuff tear arthropathy - CTA - prosthesis for shoulder arthritis: Surgery with a cementless CTA prosthesis can lessen pain and improve function in shoulders with the combination of arthritis and rotator cuff tears.
  17. Diagnosis of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability.
  18. Diagnosis of Capsulorraphy Arthropathy.
  19. Diagnosis of Glenohumeral Degenerative Joint Disease.
  20. Diagnosis of Rotator Cuff Tears.
  21. Diagnosis of the Frozen Shoulder.
  22. Diagnosis of the Post-traumatic Stiff Shoulder.
  23. Evaluation of Recurrent Instability.
  24. Evaluation of the Rough Shoulder.
  25. Evaluation of the Stiff Shoulder.
  26. Evaluation of the Weak Shoulder.
  27. Examination Under Anesthesia.
  28. Failed Shoulder Replacement and Revision.
  29. Glenohumeral Arthritis References.
  30. Home Exercises for the Rough Shoulder.
  31. Home Exercises for Stiff Shoulder
  32. Home Exercises for the Unstable Shoulder.
  33. Home Exercises for the Weak Shoulder.
  34. Humeroscapular Positions and Motion.
  35. Humerothoracic Positions and Motion.
  36. Injuries Associated with Anterior Dislocations.
  37. Intermediate Shoulder Instability.
  38. Management of Glenohumeral Arthritis.
  39. Management of Scapulothoracic Roughness.
  40. Mechanics of Glenohumeral Arthritis.
  41. Mechanics of Glenohumeral Arthroplasty.
  42. Mechanics of Glenohumeral Instability.
  43. Mechanics of Shoulder Strength.
  44. More Information on Rotator Cuff Surgery.
  45. Outcome Measurement.
  46. Posterior glenoid osteoplasty for unstable dislocating shoulders. Surgery to build up the back of the glenoid socket using an osteotomy and graft can restore shoulder anatomy and lessen pain and improve function.
  47. Ream and Run for Shoulder Arthritis: Conservative Reconstructive Surgery for Selected Individuals Desiring Higher Levels of Activity than Recommended for Traditional Total Shoulder Joint Replacement
  48. Ream and Run non-prosthetic glenoid arthroplasty for shoulder arthritis: Regenerative cementless surgery designed for individuals desiring higher levels of activity than recommended for traditional total joint replacement.
  49. Rehabilitation after Shoulder Arthroplasty.
  50. Rehabilitation following shoulder joint replacement arthroplasty
  51. Relevant Anatomy of Glenohumeral Instability.
  52. Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgery for shoulders with torn rotator cuff tendons can lessen shoulder pain and improve function without acromioplasty.
  53. Reverse Shoulder Replacement (Delta joint replacement) for arthritis: Surgery with a reverse prosthesis can lessen shoulder pain and improve function in shoulders with failed surgery or combined arthritis, rotator cuff tears and instability.
  54. Reverse Total Shoulder or Delta Shoulder for Shoulder Arthritis Combined with Massive Rotator Cuff Tear and for Failed Conventional Total Shoulder Replacement
  55. Rotator Cuff Clinical Presentation.
  56. Rotator Cuff Differential Diagnosis.
  57. Rotator Cuff Failure.
  58. Rotator Cuff Historical Review.
  59. Rotator Cuff Imaging Techniques.
  60. Rotator Cuff References.
  61. Rotator Cuff Relevant Anatomy and Mechanics.
  62. Rotator Cuff Tear: When to Repair and When to Smooth and Move the Shoulder
  63. Rotator Cuff Treatment.
  64. SF 36 and Health Status.
  65. Scapulothoracic Positions and Motion.
  66. Shoulder Arthritis
  67. Shoulder Arthritis Book
  68. Shoulder Bibliography.
  69. Shoulder and Elbow Cases to Consider.
  70. Shoulder arthritis and rotator cuff tears: The combination of arthritis and rotator cuff tears is called rotator cuff tear arthropathy. The management of this condition requires thought and experience.
  71. Shoulder arthritis: Osteoarthritis, Chondrolysis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Degenerative joint disease, and arthritis after shoulder surgery.
  72. Shoulder joint replacement arthroplasty for shoulder arthritis pain and stiffness: two options: total shoulder and ream and run
  73. Shoulder osteoarthritis, chondrolysis, rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and arthritis after shoulder arthroscopy and open surgery.
  74. Simple Shoulder Test.
  75. Subacromial Smoothing.
  76. Surface replacement for shoulder arthritis: Surgery with a CAP, a special type of conservative resurfacing joint replacement that resurfaces the ball of the ball and socket joint, can lessen pain and improve function.
  77. Surgery for Atraumatic Instability of the Shoulder.
  78. Surgical release for stiff frozen shoulders: Surgery to remove scar tissue and release contractures can lessen pain and improve function for stiff shoulders that have not responded to rehabilitation or physical therapy.
  79. The CTA Prosthesis for Shoulder Arthritis Combined with Massive Rotator Cuff Tear When the Shoulder Is Stable
  80. Total Shoulder Replacement Arthroplasty for Shoulder Arthritis
  81. Total elbow joint replacement for elbow arthritis: Surgery with a dependable, time-tested prosthesis can lessen pain and improve function in elbows, especially in rheumatoid arthritis of the elbow
  82. Total shoulder joint replacement for shoulder arthritis: Surgery with a dependable, time-tested conservative prosthesis and accelerated rehabilitation can lessen pain and improve function in shoulders with arthritis.
  83. Traumatic Shoulder Instability.
  84. Treating Shoulder Dislocation / Subluxation (Instability) and Associated Pain with Minimally Invasive Arthroscopy
  85. Treatment of Recurrent Instability.
  86. Treatment of Rotator Cuff Lesions.
  87. Treatment of Traumatic Dislocations.
  88. Types of Glenohumeral Instability.
  89. What is the relationship between frozen shoulder and diabetes?