Bone marrow- or vessel wall-derived osteoprotegerin is sufficient to reduce atherosclerotic lesion size and vascular calcification.

11/20/2013

Bone marrow- or vessel wall-derived osteoprotegerin is sufficient to reduce atherosclerotic lesion size and vascular calcification. Callegari A, Coons ML, Ricks JL, Yang HL, Gross TS, Huber P, Rosenfeld ME, Scatena M. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Nov;33(11):2491-500. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.113.301755. Epub 2013 Aug 29. PMID: 23990207

Vascular calcification refers to the mineralization of ectopic soft tissue in the walls of vessels in the vasculature system.  Of most concern is arterial wall mineralization, which is present in a majority of patients affected by cardiovascular disease. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a protein known to be involved in regulating bone homeostasis but has also been shown to play a controversial role in vascular calcification.  Researchers at the UW’s Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine and Department of Bioengineering have found that OPG can strongly inhibit calcium deposition in vessel walls.  OPG’s role may provide important insight into the therapy and treatment of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries caused by plaque formation) and vascular calcification.

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